Tag Archive for VMware

HP Discover Europe 2014 – Day 2 Roundup

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Day 2 started early with the first sessions beginning around 8.30am. I won’t bore you with the details of my day, but I will go through three really great new products / features I spent time learning about. Much of the info below came from slides, or discussions with product managers / engineers, so should not be taken as gospel!

HP OneView
I have to admit I have been a little lax in having a look at OneView as yet. I took the opportunity at the event to have a chat with some of the OneView engineers, and take the hands on lab. If you haven’t already done so, and you have any HP kit on premises, I strongly suggest you take a look at this product! I’m not going to go into any depth here, except to describe one of my favourite features.

OneView has the ability to connect into your servers, storage, and fabric, then auto-deploy, configure and manage your environment, end-to-end. An example of this might be if you are provisioning a new server. OneView can create new volumes based on specific policies, auto-configure all of your SAN zoning between your server initiator and targets (with single initiator, multiple target or single initiator, single array options only for now), then build the OS, configure and mount the storage on the server. How cool is that?

HP OneView

HP OneView

This is currently based on a specific subset of vendors, mainly only HP and Brocade AFAIK, but other vendors are being added in the future.

Having played with it in the lab, I can confirm that it is pretty easy to learn and use, with most information and configurations layed out reasonably intuitively in the BUI.

For more information on OneView see HP’s site.

ProLiant Gen9 Features
As I understand it, one of the key strategies behind the new ProLiant range is to ensure that HP are not losing on price / value against some of their less pricey competitors (who shall of course remain nameless as you know who they are already!). The premise here is that instead of buying top of the range servers with all the wizardry built in by default (with an appropriately top of the range price!), you can start with a base unit and only add the features you actually need. A prime example of this being that you don’t need a storage controller if you just boot from USB for a hypervisor!

This strategy has led to the removal (by default, you can configure it back again) of things like 10Gb FlexibleLOM network ports, front panel fault indicators, the onboard RAID card is now a plugin module, etc. The theory being that the Gen 9 servers, though newer, should actually come in at a better price point than their Gen 8 ancestors. The marketing shpiel is that the new Gen 9 servers deliver “the right compute for the right workload at the right economics every time”.

HP Gen 9

HP Gen 9

Cheesy marketing slogan? Absolutely!

Do they seem to deliver on this? From some of the indicative pricing I’ve seen so far, I’d say yes…

Just as a quick overview of the new ranges:

  • 10 Series (DL60 / DL80 Gen 9)
    • The 10 series is designed to be an entry level model for SMBs. These also now come with dual PSU as a CTO option, which suddenly makes them a lot more attractive in my mind.
  • 100 Series (DL160DL180 Gen 9)
    • This is not the same as the old 100 series machines from the G7 era and before. It is effectively equivalent to a DL3x0e (entry) machine in the previous generation ranges.
  • 300 Series (DL360 / DL380 Gen 9)
    • This now equates to the original DL3x0p series of machines, and has the maximum scalability and performance in mind.
The following (poor photo sorry) is a great slide which just lists out the key differences between each model in the range:
HP Proliant DL80/180/380 Gen 9

HP Proliant DL80/180/380 Gen 9

I suggest checking the quick specs for more info!

3PAR File Personas
As regards one of my favourite announcements from the entire event (apart from The Machine, which I will do a post on some time in the future), I was able to gather some more info on the awesome new File Personas announcement.

The first, most notable fact was that the HP are so confident in the resilience of their new arrays, that they are offering a 99.9999% Availability Guarantee! Many SLAs in the IT industry are not necessarily a guarantee of a claimed level of availability, but more a level of commercial risk accepted by the vendor or provider. That said, going with “Six Nines” definitely shows belief in your product set!

HP 3PAR File Personas

HP 3PAR File Personas

A few nuggets of info I gleaned from attending the File Personas breakout session were as follows:

  • Priority Optimisation will work but is not currently certified as supported. The following technologies are inherited from block persona, and are supported from day one:
    • Wide striping
    • Replication
    • Thin Provisioning
  • From a multi tenancy perspective, the initial release will only utilise up to one Active Directory source per array (not per Virtual File Server) as the controllers each have machine accounts in your domain, which is somewhat disappointing as a service provider who always asks “can it be multi-tenanted?”. It will provide up to 4 IPs per virtual file server, and these can be on separate VLANs and trusts may be used, so there is some scope for flexibility.
  • Licensing and configuration of virtual file servers is always based on multiples of 1TiB (note TiB not TB), but you can then use quotas to subdivide your file store allocations below this.
  • The $129 per TiB is based on the amount allocated to a virtual file server, irrespective of the back end storage or thin provisioning utilisation. You will not be forced to license the entire array. For example:
    • You have an array with say 100 TiB of usable space
    • 10TiB allocation to a virtual file server
    • 5TiB in use by end user files
    • 10TiB of license required

The price point seems genuinely good value to me. Compared to the cost of purchasing, powering and managing something like a Windows File Server Cluster, it’s really a no-brainer!

That should just about do it for today! Final day tomorrow will be mainly comprised of a few more sessions followed by a looooong wait for my flight home…

Disclaimer: As an HP customer, HP kindly provided my accommodation and entry to the HP discover event, but there was no expectation or request for me to write about their products or services.

HP Discover Europe 2014 – Day 1 Roundup

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It’s been a pretty interesting day here at my first HP Discover, and I thought I would jot down a few thoughts about the day. Many of my opinions and thoughts are slightly biased by the fact that I also attended my first VMworld only last month, at the same venue, so it has been very interesting to compare the differences…

The first thing that really jumped out at me is the level at which the conference appears to be targeted, from a technical perspective. There is definitely a much more business user focussed feel to the event, with many more “people in suits” around, though still plenty of opportunity to get your geek on with the engineers in the Discover Zone. This seems to be reflected in the content at the sessions I have attended so far, which seem to be more around business objectives and solution value, rather than deep dive technical specifics. I guess part of this is driven by the target audience, and part by the vast array of HP products represented. There simply isn’t enough time or space to be able to deep dive on every HP product!

HP Discover at Fira Barcelona Gran Via

HP Discover at Fira Barcelona Gran Via

Speaking of space, although HP Discover is only slightly larger than VMworld (around 11,000 attendees vs 9,000), they actually utilise halls 4 & 5 of the Fira Barcelona Gran Via as well at halls 6 to 8.1. If you thought you had sore dogs by the end of VMworld, you can multiply that up by another 50% for HP Discover; the place is simply vast! If I am fortunate enough to be invited back next year, I may have to try to sneak in a scooter!

It's Mahooosive!

It’s Mahooosive!

My morning was mainly spent taking in a few sessions including a very interesting panel discussion on SDN, Network virtualisation and BYOD, hosted by the inimitable Ethan Banks (of PacketPushers).

Keynote
For me, the keynotes continued the themes I have mentioned above.

I wont go into all of the specifics of all of the announcements as I’m sure there will be plenty on the blogosphere who will do it better justice than I can, but there were a couple of bits and bobs which were particularly interesting to me personally and I recommend people check out, including:

  • 3PAR 7200c/7440c/7450c
    The new 3PAR 7000c line of mid tier arrays, which has been evolved somewhat with the usual increases in capacity, but more interestingly, the ability to present both block and file direct from the controllers using the new file personas feature which the LonVMUG’s own Craig Kilborn did a great intro on. The pricing looks interesting too at $129 per TB, which even at list price would be very good value as long as you don’t have to license all of the usable storage in your array, whether you need it or not; something I want to find out asap! :)
  • HP Enterprise Services for Office 365
    At a high level this seems to be the ability to have HP manage your Office 365 environment either within the standard MS DCs, or potentially within an HP DC. For me this is a step in the right direction, but where it would get really interesting would be if they could extend it all they way out to a customer DC, where I could then potentially look to use things like Exchange in Online Mode, for compatibility with remote desktops (RDS/XenApp etc).

In the afternoon I spent some time in the Discover Zone having a chat with a number of technology experts. A couple of nuggets which stuck for me were:

  • HP will (at last) be providing a Storage Spaces certified JBOD solution early next year; something they have been missing for no discernable reason.
  • DL80 servers now have dual PSU capability if purchased as a CTO SKU. If all you need is a bunch of compute hosts for your vSphere farm, booting from USB and using FC/iSCSI storage, then you wouldn’t go far wrong considering these, or even the DL60 range…

In the evening I attended the UK&I Customer Reception at the W Barcelona, which was highly enjoyable, thanks HP!

Overall, a very interesting and enjoyable day one event, and great to see HP still continuing to innovate. By the time I hit my room this evening, both my feet and brain were tired out!

Tomorrow I plan to take in some more sessions, have a nose around the tech preview zone at some point and revisit one or two of the converged systems stands, as well as have a play with OneView.

A RedHat Red Hat

A RedHat Red Hat!

 

PS – Marketing award of the day has to go to the guys from RedHat. You couldn’t look anywhere without seeing a sea of Scarlet Fedoras within hours of the start of the day! Must try to grab one tomorrow for my kids… :)

Disclaimer: As an HP customer, HP kindly provided my accommodation and entry to the HP discover event, but there was no expectation or request for me to write about their products or services.

VMworld Europe 2014 – Day Three Roundup and Closing Thoughts

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Well that’s it, its all over! Having never been to a VMworld prior to this week, I have to say the event does indeed live up to the hype!

Day Three
Day three started pretty subdued, not only from the point of view of the attendees, but a couple of the presenters as well; it definitely seems people had a good time at the VMworld party the night before!

Mixing in a bit of session time with a visit to the solution exchange and a bit of Hands on Labbing was the order of the day. I did have a quite amusing chat with one of the guys working on the Oracle stand. He said that the vast majority of people who had spoken to him had berated them about licensing and support in virtual environments, along with asking why they were advertising OVM at a VMware event. I think the poor guy was not far from the end of his tether!

My last role was at Oracle, so I can fully feel the pain around the license questions as it was almost always the first thing people asked me about when I told them I worked there! It doesn’t help the fact that the latest licensing hard vs soft partitioning guide is still only from 2011!

Oracle Tastiness!

Oracle Tastiness!

One thing I will be very interested to see is what becomes the defacto stance on how many hosts you must license once share-nothing VMotion between clusters, vCenters and DCs comes along in vSphere 6. It begs the question whether any Oracle auditor might have the audacity to suggest that you need to license all hosts in all DCs?

This of course assumes that the specific auditor will not accept mandatory cluster affinity as per Richard’s comments here: http://www.licenseconsulting.eu/vmworld-tv-oracle-on-licensing-vmware-virtualized-environments-updated/

Hopefully in this scenario, common sense would prevail, but that’s deep enough down that rabbit hole for now! :)

The sessions I managed to attend on day 3 were as follows:

STO2521 – VSAN Best Practices
Rawlinson Rivera & Kiran Madnani provided a very useful overview of a number of example use cases and how to apply different VSAN configurations. As this was covering multiple use cases there was some repetition of content, but not so far as to be distracting. Key takeaway, when it comes to disk groups, more = better!

VSAN Use Cases

VSAN Use Cases

STO2496 – Storage Best Practices for Next-Gen Storage Platforms
Being a bit of a storage geek, for me this was one of the best sessions of the entire week. Not only entertaining, but the quantity and quality of the information was intense to say the least! A couple of key areas which they covered were around benchmarking of storage (not just using the standard 4k 100% Read profiles which vendors use to produce stats for their marketing material).

Absurd Testing at the Chad & Vaughn Show

Absurd Testing at the Chad & Vaughn Show

TEX1985 – Lessons Learned from a Real Life VSAN POC at Trend Micro
It’s always interesting to see how real customers found the use of a technology. Arsenio Mateos from Trend Micro was not particularly detailed in any specific issues they experienced, as he concentrated more on the decisions behind the solution, and the benefits it broupght them.  Cormac on the other hand was very open and when into some detail as to some of the configuration issues and bugs which were common among other customer deployments. I was also the grateful recipient of a signed copy of the book Cormac co-wrote with Duncan Epping.

EUC2027 – Characterise Performance in Horizon 6
My final session rounded out the end of the day. I don’t currently use or design VMware Horizon View in my current role, when most commonly customers have managed RDS or Citrix XenApp farms. I mainly went to the session to see the VMware approach to sizing the new session host desktops on Horizon 6. Unsurprisingly it turns out that they come out with very similar ratios and guidelines as Citrix do (shocking)!  The really interesting takeaway for me from this session was the VMware View Planner tool, which looked like it could definitely have some value in load testing and gauging the requirements for customers with or without VMware View.

By this time it was 4.30, and everything had closed. If I’m honest I was a bit gutted as I had believed the HoLs were going to be open until 6. I was most of the way through my NSX lab, so I guess I’ll just have to finish it up from home!

After the event, my remaining colleagues and I wandered into town to check out the Sagrada Familia, and grab some light refreshments + tasty tapas.

Sagrada Familia

Sagrada Familia

Wrapping Up
Session Surveys – The one thing I didn’t actually get done at the show (but I plan to fill in this weekend), was the session surveys. I understand these are as valuable to the speakers as to VMware, so I have no issues spending a bit of time giving feedback. If you haven’t already, then I suggest you do, especially if you want to see the same guys & gals back next year!

If I were to be able to make any suggestions to VMware for next year they would be few and far between:

  • Keep the hang space and hands on labs and/or solution exchange open until 6pm on day 3. It’s minimal extra effort but it will allow attendees to make the absolute most of the event and facilities, especially those who don’t have an early flight back the same day.
  • Make the information on getting to the event a bit easier to find on the VMworld.com site (rather than burying it in the FAQs)
  • Free Segways or (or foot massages) for all attendees!

I enjoyed a wander or two around the solution hall, but for me the best and most useful elements of the entire week were the breakout sessions (and being there live giving me the opportunity to ask questions at the end), and networking with others both in the event and at the vendor sponsored evenings.

As a side note, I will probably be creating PDFs of all of my notes and posting these on the blog imminently for anyone who may find them useful.

So finally a big thank you to everyone who made VMworld a success; the organisers, the vendors, the speakers, the HoL team and all of the people with whom I had the such interesting and entertaining discussions!

Key Stats
Number of days attended4 (including partner day)
Blog articles published6
Blogs word count
6,516
Live breakout / HoL sessions attended14
Total session notes word count10,412
Average notes word count per session743
Hands on Labs Completed2
Number of steps walkedNo idea as I don’t have a Fitbit!
Total hours slept in 4 nights< 24
Contacts madeMany
Knowledge gainedIncalculable
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